Last night, I returned from 9 days of learning and participation at Fielding Graduate University.  My mind is fuller than it was when I left, and my heart is compelled to stay on the learning path.  Provost Katrina Rogers discussed learning spaces: what are they, and how are they leveraged?  She asked those questions several days ago . . . and now, many times a day I notice numerous learning spaces in my life.  Rooms with conversations, dialogue, and moments of listening or observing all offer rich learning spaces.  Google Scholar has incredible free resources.  My car, driving to and from my children’s activities, is a learning space with the kids. Online sessions with moderators are other learning spaces.  Mostly, I notice that I can choose to create a learning space or step into one created through technology or other methods.

Another question this week was about our choice points in learning—specifically, what are they?  Think about it: how many times a day do we have choice points in learning? Every moment, right before we take action, is a choice point.  We can make the automatic choice that is so natural to us, or we can pause and ask, what needs to happen?

As my children emerge more into the social world, my awareness and attention of how I am with them, as a guide and facilitator, is so important for their future. For example, do I mediate every altercation, or are there times when I let the kids organically figure things out for themselves?  What is my response when one does poorly on a test and his or her sibling receives an excellent grade?  How do I organize myself when there are reports of bullying on the bus?  Each conversation is a learning conversation. Each moment with each child is a memory-making event.

Just as we have learning and memory-making events with our children, these opportunities are also available with persons at work, in the grocery line, and at a traffic light. We are accountable for those moments. It really is true: we make what we get, and we make it in communication with one another.

Deedee Myers